Home » The Divine Aspect of History, Vol. 2 of 2 by John Rickards Mozley
The Divine Aspect of History, Vol. 2 of 2 John Rickards Mozley

The Divine Aspect of History, Vol. 2 of 2

John Rickards Mozley

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331462705
Paperback
526 pages
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 About the Book 

Excerpt from The Divine Aspect of History, Vol. 2 of 2To those who with me believe that Jesus Christ implanted in mankind the root of eternal life, I must begin by saying this: It cannot be my direct object to write this chapter so as to please you-MoreExcerpt from The Divine Aspect of History, Vol. 2 of 2To those who with me believe that Jesus Christ implanted in mankind the root of eternal life, I must begin by saying this: It cannot be my direct object to write this chapter so as to please you- and it may be my misfortune not to please you. For I must think that you, my fellow-Christians, have shared the lot of all men, even the best and wisest men, in all nations of the earth- and while attaining some truth, have mingled some error with it, even in your most formal utterances. From that error, you say, you were delivered not always, but in those choice moments, when your creeds were first accepted by the united Church, in its representative assemblies- and those creeds, being once true, are of course always true. That is your statement- I must think it overpresuming as a principle, though it might no doubt be correct as a fact- but the most ardent Christians propound it as a principle. Supposing, however, the unerringness of the Christian creeds not to be propounded as a principle, but the affirmation to be simply that the Christian creeds are entirely correct as facts, which is what more moderate Christians affirm- I am constrained to say that I cannot think that this affirmation holds. It is, however, a fair matter of argument whether the Christian creeds are entirely true or not- and I must try to show in the following pages the leading considerations which bear on this point.The creed called the Nicene creed (though the appellation is not quite correct, but it may be adopted without serious mistake) is by far the most authoritative of the Christian creeds- it is true that the Eastern and Western Churches differ as to one expression in it- but that expression will not enter into the discussion of the present chapter. Putting the Filioque aside, the Nicene creed is the creed which commands the assent of all Christians in a degree in which no other creed does- it is the accepted Christianity of to-day.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.